Sayre Team Active Research Programs

The following research projects are active research projects with Dr. Richard Sayre. These may be Los Alamos National Laboratory projects or industry projects with a private company that take place within the NMC Biological Laboratory and Greenhouse. 
 

Breeding Algae for Enhanced Productivity 

DOE, AOP-LANL (2016-present)  
 
 

Development of pH-responsive Protein Switches to Regulate Energy Capture and Conversion Processes in Photosynthesis 

DOE, ER, (2015-2018) 
(RTS, PI)
 
 

PACE, Producing Algae for Energy and Co-products 

DOE-BETO TABB Program (2017-19)
(RTS, PI)

 

Improved Photosynthetic Efficiency in C3 Plants

Bayer Crop Sciences (2016-2018) 
(RTS, PI)
 
 

Developing an Infrastructure and Product Test Pipeline to Deliver Novel Therapies for Citrus Greening Disease 

Goutam Gupta, NMC Research Scientist

U.S. Citrus growers have a critical need for grove-deployable management practices that keep healthy citrus from becoming infected and infected trees from becoming symptomatic. This project presents a systems-based pipeline approach delivering commercial, grove-deployable solutions using a novel therapeutic delivery strategy and citrus transgenics. A data integration and analysis platform combining existing complex –omics/biological data with molecular/cellular research will steer hypothesis driven screening of inhibitors of multiple molecular pathways to provide solutions that can be optimized by combinatorial delivery to citrus. Research areas will include: 1) molecular interaction inhibitor discovery (gut membrane binding peptides, RNA aptamers and non-toxic chemical library screening) to block psyllid acquisition/transmission of the HLB-bacterium and/or bacterial growth in the plant; 2) dsRNA delivery to induce psyllid RNAi responses that block bacterium transmission or kill the psyllid (or both) and; 3) optimization of a novel therapeutic delivery system that has negligible environmental impact, is economical in comparison to current control strategies and is highly adaptable for different solution strategies. This research is funded by USDA NIFA via Kansas State.

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